Squam Lake, NH

Squam Lake


Town(s): Holderness NH
County: Grafton

Size: 6791 acres
Average Depth: 19 feet
Maximum Depth: 80 feet

Boating Allowed: Kayaks, Canoes, Sail Boats, Electric Motor Boats, Power Boats, Jet-skis, State & Local Rules & Regulations Apply
Swimming: Swimming Allowed, No Restrictions

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Squam Lake is a lake located in central New Hampshire, USA, south of the White Mountains, straddling the borders of Grafton, Carroll, and Belknap counties. The largest town center on the lake is Holderness. The lake is located northwest of much larger Lake Winnipesaukee. Squam is the second-largest lake located entirely in New Hampshire.

Squam Lake was originally called Keeseenunknipee, which meant "the goose lake in the highlands". The white settlers that followed shortened the name to Casumpa, Kusumpy and/or Kesumpe around 1779. In the early 19th century, the lake was given another Abenaki name, Asquam, which means "water". Finally, in the early 20th century, Asquam was shortened to its present version, Squam.

The 1981 film On Golden Pond was filmed on Squam Lake. There is one tour boat service offered by the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, based in Holderness, that will show visitors where all the filming locations are situated, as well as items of natural significance.

Squam Lake is a nesting site for Common Loons and is a good place to see them in breeding plumage during the summer months. Bald Eagles and Great Blue Herons are also known to nest on the lake.

The Squam Lakes Association (SLA) is dedicated to conserving for the public benefit the natural beauty, peaceful character and unique resource values of the lakes and surrounding area. In cooperation with local and state authorities and other conservation organizations, the Association promotes the protection, careful use and shared enjoyment of the lakes, mountains, forests, open spaces and wildlife of the Squam Lakes Region. Since 1904 the Squam Lakes Association has worked to preserve the character of the Squam Lakes.

Water Quality: Town/State Monitoring
Vegetation Growth: Minimal
Non-native Species: Unknown

Fish Species: Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Chain Pickerel, Salmon, Lake Trout, Brown Trout, Black Crappie, Yellow Perch, White Perch, Brown Bullhead, Bluegill

Boat Access: Access for Power and Non-power Boats
Parking Spaces: More than 40

Shoreline Development: 25-50%